Resources

This page includes resources for use in primary and secondary schools, including Links to information on books, school based programs, and pdf booklets.

We have also put together a list of some of the out and proud members of the LGBTQI community, that students may be familiar with. These people have paved the way for others in sports, music, acting, activism and politics. 

 

Resources for Primary Schools

 
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Books

Hares & Hyenas, a queer bookshop in Melbourne, has put together the following book lists, which contain titles and descriptions, as well as information about what ages they would be appropriate for. 

For books and resources on embracing and supporting trans and gender diverse young people, The Rainbow Owl has suggestions for children and young people, for parents and families, and for educators and schools. Parents of Gender Diverse Children also has an extensive book list.

 
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Gayby Baby Project: Movie and School Action Toolkit (Aus) 

(grade 5 +)

Australia’s first comprehensive education resource to represent same-sex parented families.  The School Action Toolkit is a Health and Physical Education / PDHPE (Y5–10) resource that explores family diversity in a fun & insightful way, using stories drawn from GAYBY BABY. Beyond the classroom, it provides staff with strategies to make their school community a safe & inclusive space for all students & their families.

 
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GLSEN (US)

(for use with Foundation/Prep - grade 6)

GLSEN is a US national education organisation, championing LGBTQ issues in K-12 education since 1990, with the mission to create safe and affirming schools for all, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.

 
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Welcoming Schools (US)

(for use with Foundation/Prep - Grade 6)

The HRC (Human Rights Campaign) Welcoming Schools approach is firmly grounded in research and a case study of the program’s efficacy and all lessons are aligned with the Common Core Standards (US).

These easy to use lesson plans help you work with your students to have real conversations to welcome diversity, prevent bias-based bullying, understand gender and support transgender and non-binary students.

 
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RRRR – Resilience, Rights and Respectful Relationships (Australia)

The Resilience, Rights and Respectful Relationships learning materials have been designed for teachers in primary and secondary schools to develop students' social, emotional and positive relationship skills. Efforts to promote social and emotional skills and positive gender norms in children and young people has been shown to improve health related outcomes and subjective wellbeing. It also reduces antisocial behaviours including engagement in gender-related violence.

There are specific sections for various year levels, including Foundation, 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10 and 11-12.  Topic Seven in each section covers gender and identity, with a very brief covering of non-heterosexual sexualities, and trans and gender diverse identities, and relevant aspects of privilege.

 

Resources for Secondary Schools

 
logo books.jpeg

Books

Hares & Hyenas, a queer bookshop in Melbourne, has put together the following book lists, which contain titles and descriptions, as well as information about what ages they would be appropriate for. 

For books and resources on embracing and supporting trans and gender diverse young people, The Rainbow Owl has suggestions for children and young people, for parents and families, and for educators and schools.

 
 
 
logo Gayby baby.jpeg

Gayby Baby Project: Movie and School Action Toolkit (Aus) 

(grade 5 +)

Australia’s first comprehensive education resource to represent same-sex parented families.  The School Action Toolkit is a Health and Physical Education / PDHPE (Y5–10) resource that explores family diversity in a fun & insightful way, using stories drawn from GAYBY BABY. Beyond the classroom, it provides staff with strategies to make their school community a safe & inclusive space for all students & their families.

 
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All of Us (Australia)

Health and Physical Education Resource, Understanding Gender Diversity, Sexual Diversity and Intersex Topics. 

(Year 7 +)

This resource aims to build empathy through real life experiences of LGBTI young people through lesson plans and short videos that are aligned to the Health and Physical Education learning area of the Australian Curriculum.
This free resource allows all schools, regardless of experience, location or funding, the chance to create safe and supportive environments.

Developed jointly by the Safe Schools Coalition and Minus18, this was initially written for use with Years 7 and 8, and can be used with older students.

Guide including lesson plans.

Links to videos.

Lesson plans and topics covered.

 
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GLSEN (US)

(Foundation/prep - Yr 12)

GLSEN is a US national education organisation, championing LGBTQ issues in K-12 education since 1990, with the mission to create safe and affirming schools for all, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.

 
logo RRRR.jpeg

RRRR – Resilience, Rights and Respectful Relationships (Australia)

(Foundation/prep - Yr 12)

The Resilience, Rights and Respectful Relationships learning materials have been designed for teachers in primary and secondary schools to develop students' social, emotional and positive relationship skills. Efforts to promote social and emotional skills and positive gender norms in children and young people has been shown to improve health related outcomes and subjective wellbeing. It also reduces antisocial behaviours including engagement in gender-related violence.

There are specific sections for various year levels, including Foundation, 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10 and 11-12.  Topic Seven in each section covers gender and identity, with a very brief covering of non-heterosexual sexualities, and trans and gender diverse identities, and relevant aspects of privilege.

 
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PDF Booklets for High Schoolers

The Following resources have been put together by Safe Schools and Minus18.   Resource descriptions are from the Minus18 website.

  • Stand out

    Stand Out is a leadership resource for students who want to create change in their schools. Stand Out highlights initiatives and stories from students all over Australia. It's the perfect starting place if you want to learn how you can be a champion in your community.

  • OMG I'm Queer

    Created by young people, OMG I’m Queer takes on sexuality and gender identity, exploring them with real life experiences and attitude. Featuring contributions from queer young people from all over Australia, OMG I’m Queer is the one-stop introduction to sexuality and gender for young people.

  • OMG My Friend's queer

    This street magazine and resource is for any young people who might have a friends who is LGBTIQ, or simply wants to know more about it it all means! 

    Created by young people, with stories of straight young people from all over Australia, OMG My Friend Is Queer takes on sexuality and gender identity from the perspective a different perspective, exploring what it's like to have queer friends through real life experiences and with a bit of attitude. Featuring stories on sport, crushes and gaydar, OMG My Friend Is Queer is something you've never seen before.

  • OMG I'm Trans

    This 40 page resource contains everything you or someone you love needs to know about gender identity. OMG I'm Trans supports you to navigate coming out, school uniform, legal rights, talking to doctors, and everything else that can be tricky on your own.

    Written by trans young people, for trans young people, this booklet is one of the only youth-driven trans resources available in Australia. 

 

List of Some Well-known LGBTQI People

This year’s Wear It Purple theme is “Stand Up. Stand Out.”, paying tribute to the positive impact of LGBTQI people who have been able to be out, proud and visible.  Wear it Purple recognises that not everyone can feel safe to come out and this year they want to connect people to the stories of those who have lived their truth and flourished.

There are many out and proud members of the LGBTQI community who have paved the way for others in sports, music, acting, activism and politics. 

Below is a list of some of the well-known LGBTQI people that your students may be familiar with, many of whom are Wear It Purple ambassadors.

 

Hannah Gadsby (comedian, writer, actor, tv presenter)

Hannah Gadsby (she/her) is an Australian comedian, writer, actor and tv presenter who identifies as a lesbian.  She became internationally famous in 2018 with her stand-up show Nanette.  Hannah uses her platforms to speak about the impact of homophobia, as well as her personal experiences of mental health issues and autism.  

http://hannahgadsby.com.au/

 

Benjamin Law (author, journalist, screen writer, tv producer)

Benjamin Law (he/him) is an Australian author and journalist. He often writes about issues from his experiences growing up gay and Asian, in Australia.  He is an advocate for LGBTQI+ inclusion and is an ambassador for Wear It Purple.  His twitter handle is “Writer, raconteur and local homosexual”.

"I’m stoked and proud to support Wear It Purple. The first step towards pride is visibility, and that’s not just visibility of young LGBTIQA+ people and their communities, but also the myriad allies who support and celebrate them. Young queer folks are still targetted in schools, workplaces and homes, and it’s joint responsibility to ensure these kids and teens not only feel safe, but valued, celebrated and loved."

https://twitter.com/mrbenjaminlaw?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

https://benjamin-law.com/

 

Jordan Raskopoulos (comedian, actress, singer, speaker, activist)

Jordan Raskopoulos (she/her) is an Australian comedian, actor, singer, speaker and activist.  After about 10 years of performing, Jordan came out as transgender.  She does advocacy work in the area of trans issues, LGBTIQ+ inclusion, and did a TEDx talk on living with high functioning anxiety.  Jordan is also an ambassador for Wear It Purple. 

"Growing up as a trans youth in the 80s and 90s there was no one to turn to or speak to. I dealt with feelings around my identity, alone. I was depressed, anxious and confused. I'm fortunate to have survived. Wear it Purple's commitment to creating supportive, safe, inclusive and empowering spaces for young rainbow people is vital. I'm very pleased and proud to be an ambassador for Wear it Purple."

https://www.jordanrasko.com/

 

Harry Cook (actor, writer, activist)

Harry Cook (he/him) is a British/Australian actor, and writer.  He came out as gay in 2013 and has been a strong advocate for LGBTIQ+ rights.  He is an ambassador for Wear It Purple. 

“I’m beyond stoked to be an ambassador for Wear It Purple Day again this year. It’s an incredible initiative to show the LGBTQI+ youth of Australia that we support them exactly as they are. Join me on August 30th and donate/wear purple and let the queer youth of Australia know we’re with them 100%.”

https://www.harryjcook.com/

 

Georgie Stone (transgender activist, actor)

Georgie Stone (she/her) is an Australian actor, writer and transgender rights trailblazer and advocate. At the age of 10, she was the youngest person to receive hormone blockers in Australia setting a precedent that eventually changed the law that compelled transgender children and their families to apply to the Family Court to access stage one treatment (puberty blockers). She continues to advocate for transgender children, and for the removal of the Family Court from the medical decisions of trans teens.  Georgie is the official Ambassador of the Royal Children’s Hospital Gender Service and Wear It Purple.

https://transcendsupport.com.au/about/georgie-stone/

 

Megan Rapinoe (athlete)

Megan Rapinoe (she/her) is a lesbian American professional soccer player.  She co-captianed the US women’s soccer team to victory in the 2019 world cup.  Megan is an advocate for numerous LGBT organizations, and for the equal pay of female athletes.

https://www.facebook.com/mPinoe/

 

Ellen Page (actor, producer, activist)

Ellen Page (she/her) is a lesbian Canadian tv and film actor and producer.  She uses her public profile to advocate for environmental, animal and human rights. 

https://twitter.com/ellenpage?lang=en

 

Ellen DeGeneres (comedian, tv host, actor, writer and producer)

Ellen DeGeneres (she/her) is a lesbian American comedian, television host, actor, writer, and producer.  Ellen publicly came out in 1996, and the character she played in her self-titled sitcom Ellen came out in an episode in 1997.  This was a watershed event in US prime-time tv.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Puppy_Episode

https://www.facebook.com/ellentv/

 

Hanne Gaby Odiele (supermodel)

Hanne Gaby Odiele (they/them) is an intersex supermodel born in Belgium.  They campaign against Intersex Genital Mutilation and advocate that children should be given the opportunity to decide on surgery for themselves.

https://www.instagram.com/hannegabysees/?hl=en

 

Lady Gaga (singer, songwriter and actor)

Lady Gaga (she/her) is a bisexual American singer, songwriter, musician and actor. She also has fibromyalgia, a chronic pain condition, which causes her significant disability and at times leaving her unable to perform. She uses her enormous public platform to promote awareness and inclusion of the LGBTIQ+ community, and more recently to promote awareness of fibromyalgia and other invisible disabilities.

https://www.ladygaga.com/

 

Sia (singer, songwriter)

Sia (she/her) is a bisexual Australian singer and songwriter.  She is also a strong advocate against puppy-farming, and other animal rights issues. 

https://www.siamusic.net/

 

Dani Weber (drag king, activist, youth worker)

Dani Weber (they/them) is a bisexual non-binary Australian speaker, events producer and dragtivist who performs as drag king Dani Boi.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/feb/25/how-i-fell-in-love-with-performing-as-a-drag-king

 

Troye Sivan (songwriter, actor, YouTuber)

Troye Sivan (he/him) is a gay South-African born Australian singer, songwriter, actor and YouTuber.

https://www.troyesivan.com/

 

Missy Higgins (singer, songwriter, actor)

Missy Higgins (she/her) is a bisexual Australian, singer, songwriter and actor.  She uses her public platform to speak out about animal rights, climate change, and refugee issues. 

https://www.missyhiggins.com/

 

Casey Conway (athlete, Indigenous Australian activist)

Casey (he/him) is a gay Aboriginal Australian model, youth worker, and former professional rugby league player for the Sydney Roosters.  He speaks publicly about coping with the dual prejudices of homophobia and racism, and about the issues around homosexuality in Aboriginal culture.  He is currently a youth worker performing outreach for homeless kids, as well as an ambassador for Wear It Purple. 

https://www.sbs.com.au/topics/sexuality/agenda/article/2016/10/12/casey-conway-coming-out-isnt-just-hard-first-time-we-do-it

 

Jason Ball (athlete, activist)

Jason Ball (he/him) is a gay Australian LGBTI and mental health advocate, and one of Australian Football’s most well-known openly gay male players.  He advocates for culture change within the AFL, by speaking about how homophobic comments and behaviour impacted on him as a young player. 

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2018/sep/06/jason-ball-scored-an-lgbt-first-in-football-now-his-goal-is-politics

 

Charmaine Bingwa (actor)

Charmaine Bingwa (she/her) is a lesbian Australian actor. In 2018, Bingwa made history becoming the first openly gay, person of colour (Zimbabwean heritage) to be awarded the Heath Ledger Scholarship in its 10 year duration. She is also an ambassador for Wear It Purple. 

"I didn't come out until I was in my twenties because of the fear of ridicule and lack of acceptance. Coming out was the best thing for my life and it's why I want to give my full support to help create safety for our rainbow youth to be exactly who they are."

http://www.charmainebingwa.com/about/

 

Liv Hewson (actor)

Liv Hewson (they/them) is a non-binary actor from Canberra, Australia. You can see them in stuff like Santa Clarita Diet, Homecoming Queens, Top of the Lake, Before I Fall, and a bunch of other things. They currently live and work mostly in the States.  Liv is also an ambassador for Wear It Purple. 

"As an LGBT person with a platform, it's important to me to advocate for and support LGBT people with the space I've been afforded, especially young LGBT people, and especially in Australia where I'm from. Personally, I feel that Australian LBGT youth have had to endure a level of public vitriol, particularly recently, that is unacceptable. Wear It Purple is an organization that works to foster a community of support and protection for young LGBT people in Australia; I feel that that is deeply necessary work and am happy to be a part of it."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liv_Hewson

 

Nevo Zisin (trans and non-binary activist, author)

Nevo Zisin (they/them) is a Jewish, queer, non-binary writer, activist and public speaker with a particular focus on issues surrounding gender, sex, culture and sexuality. Based in Naarm / Birraranga / Melbourne, they run workshops in schools and workplaces around trans issues. They are also the author of award-winning Finding Nevo, a memoir on gender transition and a contributor toKindred: 12 Queer #LoveOzYA Stories.  Nevo is also an ambassador for Wear It Purple. 

 “We know that young LGBTIQA+ people are some of the most vulnerable in our community. Wear It Purple shows them that they are loved, cared for and considered. I’m proud to support this day of celebration and wear the best colour there is with pride!“

https://www.facebook.com/nevozisin/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nevo_Zisin

 

Ruby Rose (actor and musician)

Ruby Rose (she/her) is a lesbian, gender-fluid Australian model, actress, and television presenter.  She uses her platform to support animal welfare, campaigns for anti-bullying and youth mental health.  She is an ambassador for Headspace.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_Rose

 

Magda Szubanski AO (actor, LGBTIQ+ activist)

Magda Szubanski (she/her) is one of the most well-known and well-trusted celebrities in Australia.  She has been a television and film actress, comedian and writer, since the mid-1980s, and in 2017 she became one of the most prominent faces of the “Yes” campaign for marriage equality.  Since coming out as a lesbian in 2012, Magda has been able to use her status as an Australian icon to increase awareness and support for the LGBTQIA+ community, and to show all Australians how powerful it can be to live their truth.  In January 2019, Magda was awarded an officer (AO) of the Order of Australia for her services to the performing arts and same-sex marriage.

https://tedxsydney.com/contributor/magda-szubanski/

 

Penny Wong (politician)

Penny Wong (she/her) is a lesbian Malaysian-born Australian federal politician (ALP).  She is the first Asian-born member of an Australian cabinet, and the first openly LGBTI federal parliamentarian.  She has two children, born in 2011 and 2015, conceived via known donor and IVF.  Speaking publicly about the birth of her children was one of the first times that many Australians learned about an LGBTQI family.   

https://www.aph.gov.au/Senators_and_Members/Parliamentarian?MPID=00AOU

 

Michael Kirby AC (jurist, academic, former Justice of the High Court)

Michael Kirby (he/him) is an Australian jurist, academic, and a former Justice of the High Court of Australia.  In 2013 he led an inquiry into human rights abuses in North Korea, on behalf of the United Nations Human Rights Council.  Openly gay since the mid-1980s, Kirby has often spoken publicly in support of gay rights and the importance of human sexuality as an aspect of human rights.  Kirby was awarded a Companion of the Order of Australia, for service to the law, law reform, to learning and to the community. 

https://www.michaelkirby.com.au/

 

Tony Briffa (politician, activist)

Tony Briffa (they/them) is an Australian local councillor, former mayor and activist for the human rights of intersex people, particularly against the non-medically necessary medical interventions routinely done to intersex infants and children.  Tony is the world’s first openly intersex public official. 

http://briffa.org/